The insertion of malware into SolarWinds’ popular Orion network management software sent the federal government and major parts of corporate America scrambling this week to investigate and mitigate what could be the most damaging breach in US history. The malware, which cybersecurity company FireEye (itself the first public victim of the supply chain interference) named SUNBURST, is a backdoor that can transfer and execute files, profile systems, reboot machines and disable system services.

Reuters broke the story that a foreign hacker had used SUNBURST to monitor email at the Treasury and Commerce Departments. Other sources later described the foreign hacker as APT29, or the Cozy Bear hacking group run by Russia’s SVR intelligence agency. Subsequent press reports indicated that the malware infection’s reach throughout the federal government could be vast and includes—only preliminarily—the State Department, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and likely parts of the Pentagon.

Former director of DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) Chris Krebs said in a tweet after news broke of the intrusion, “this thing is still early,” meaning that it will likely be months—possibly years—before the true scope of the damage is known. SolarWinds said that up to 18,000 of its 300,000 customers downloaded the tainted update, although that doesn’t mean that the adversary exploited all infected organizations.

CISA issued a rare emergency directive calling on all federal agencies to “review their networks for indicators of compromise and disconnect or power down SolarWinds Orion products immediately.” The FBI, CISA and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) issued a joint statement acknowledging they established a Cyber Unified Coordination Group (UCG) to mount a whole-of-government response under the direction of the FBI.

On December 17, CISA issued an alert that spells out the threat actor’s tactics and techniques in detail. The alert also offers steps that organizations should take to apply mitigations to networks using the Orion product. The alert further states that CISA is investigating evidence of additional initial access vectors, other than the SolarWinds Orion platform.

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